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responsibility of health insurance. let's move forward as the state of massachusetts, as the presiding officer has already done, some 98%, i understand, have health insurance protection in the commonwealth of massachusetts thanks to the leadership of governor mitt romney and the cooperation of both political parties. massachusetts has shown us the way. let's follow that now. let's not turn our back on it. and the last point i'll make on this issue is i keep hearing from the republican side they have a better idea. what is it? i'd like to see the proposal from the republican side that they would put up against the affordable care act. you'll never see it because they basically believe let the market work its will. the market working its will has resulted in 40 million to 50 million uninsured americans. the number is growing, and it shouldn't. it won't under the affordable care act. now, mr. president, i'd like to address the business pending before the united states senate, the employment nondiscrimination act, and ask consent that it be shown in a separate part of the record from my earlier st
policy ofian 3, 2013, the gentleman from massachusetts, mr. capuano is recognized for 60 minutes as the designee of the minority leader. mr. capuano: tonight, several members wanted to discuss the retirement of a very good friend of ours who deserves our recognition and with that, i'm going -- because there are so many people with busy schedules, m going to yield to minority whip, mr. hoyer. as long as you want, steny. don't worry. mr. hoyer: mr. speaker, we bring the house to order. there are some people from massachusetts causing a disturbance. capuano, who r. represents a famous area of america, south boston, a wonderful area of our country. as every member of this house knows, we rely on an outstanding group of professionals who manage the floor and the party cloak rooms. this is true for democrats and republicans. on the democratic side, we have been incredibly fortunate to have been served with great ability by a devoted public servant with a wonderful sense of humor, a sense of this house, a sense of history, a sense of decency and a sense of how to help members greatly. h
that the massachusetts connector, who is run by the same guy who was running connecticut's exchange in the first month only so 0.3% of total enrollment sign-up. so, i have confident that the rocket will fly off the shelves once people can get into the website -- this product will fly off of the sale -- shelves once people can get into the website because what we have seen in connecticut and also i am optimistic that once his site is up it will be up in time for the largest number of people to inoll, because what you said response to senator bennet's questions, the reality is that the vast majority of people are going to be looking for coverage as the enrollment date draws near. so, i guess that is the frame of my question to you. from the experience of people who have been able to access these exchanges -- either at the national level or state level -- what do we know about the quality of the product and, two, what do we know about the timing of when people actually sign up for plans like this? we have the massachusetts experience, the experience of medicare part d. to the extent your timeline plays o
of the open enrollment period 106,000 or 1.4% of consumers are going to sign up. if you look at massachusetts, during its first month -- and, mr. president, i'm sure you're aware of this, being in new jersey, close to massachusetts, only 0.3%, or 123 people signed up for coverage out of the 36er,000 who ultimately signed up in the first year. so let's be clear. we all wanted to see bigger numbers, but the affordable care act numbers are four times better than what massachusetts did in its first month. if you talk to the people of massachusetts, they love their health care plan. and our plan is based on their plan. by the way, a republican plan. hundreds of thousands have started the enrollment proficiency and i'll onprocess,. i'm going to go shopping and buy my plafnlt but i'm taking my time because i have some time -- until december. i am going to discuss it with my husband. we're going to decide what's best for us. i'm going to sign up. you know, i think it was the secretary sebelius who said, this isn't like buying a toaster. this is a commitment for a year, and you've got to take your tim
from massachusetts, ms. tsongas. ms. tsongas: i pledge allegiance to the flag of the united states of america and to the republic for which it stands, one nation, under god, indivisible, with liberty and justice for all. the speaker pro tempore: without objection the gentleman from pennsylvania, mr. shuster is recognized for one minute. mr. shuster: thank you, mr. speaker. i rise today to introduce a good friend and community leader in my home state, reverend paul taylor and thank him for offering today's invocation. he made the trip to the nation's capital from the city of letreau, pennsylvania. for the past 17 years, reverend taylor has dedicated his life to the students and faculty at st. vincent's college. he's held several positions there, dean of admissions, dean of students and executive vice president. his civic engagement and enthusiasm for improving the lives of o's is not limited to higher education he also serves on the board to have directors for the hospital charity foundation. in his personal life he's an avid hunter and served as super to the six-time bowl champio
at massachusetts during its first month, mr. president, i am sure you are aware of this being in new jersey, close to massachusetts, only 123 people signed up for coverage. of the 36,002 ultimately signed up in the first year. so let's be clear. we all want, bigger numbers. the affordable care act numbers are four times better than what massachusetts to it in its first month. if you talk to the people of massachusetts, another health care plan. our plan is based upon their plan. by the way, a republican plan. hundreds of thousands started the enrollment process, and i am one of them. i created an account and with a shopping and by my plan. but i am taking my time because i have some time. i will discuss it, decide what is best and sign up i think it was the secretary sibelius' who said this is not like buying a toaster. this is a commitment for a year. you have to take your time. don't come here and tear down the affordable care act without having to put anything in its place in focus on one problem that the president said he is going to fix and we're going to fix. things are going to pick up. i w
years, every year, the mothers against drunk driving gave massachusetts a "f" on our laws. we have personal injury lawyers in our legislature and they refuse to have any changes that would cut off the cash cow of all these people who drink, drive, get arrested, and get off. they're are numerous people who've been arrested for drunk driving 10, 12 times in a row. they are time bombs waiting to go off and we have 200 people a year getting killed by drunk drivers. think about that. over 200 people a year. many more are being injured by drunk drivers. you'd think about the misery caused by that problem and it touches thousands and thousands across the commonwealth each year. we have never change the laws to make them stricter. i finally met an amazing family. their daughter, melody, was a 13-year-old girl who got run over by a drunk driver in. daylight when she was coming back from a birthday party as a cheerleader. she was a lovely and sweet young girl. she was there young child. a woman had too many drinks at lunch and was a repeat drunk driver. she ran her over and killed her. the f
in 1838 that angelina grimke was speaking to the massachusetts state legislature, against slavery and for a woman's right to vote, only a mile away in the north end, john simmons was actively growing his tailoring business, employing many women here in boston and in the countryside around the city. having observed that most of his customers fell into standard sizes, he departed from custom tailoring and innovated the retail industry by creating a man's off the rack suit. at the end of the civil war, john simmons had become the largest clothing manufacturer in the united states. at the time of his death in 1870, his will records his intention for his great wealth. to found and endow an institution to be called simmons female college for the purpose of teaching branches of art, science, and industry, this calculated to enable the scholars to acquire an independent likelihood. recognizing the importance of being able to move beyond the menial work and menial wages to which most women of the day were hasect, john simmons enabled generations and him and to be empowered. those of us who
body. she spoke before the masses uses state legislator -- the massachusetts state legislature. coming up, this is just over two hours. [applause] >> welcome, everyone. moderatoryour evening . we are here tonight to explore how women become political. we will look at the past and the future,and consider the too. there will be some remarks and the panel of discussion you'd regretfully, senator elizabeth warren is not able to join us because she needs to be in washington. someone has to work. she is there to work in the senate. [applause] has made a short video for us that we will share place of the remarks she would have given. during the evening, we invite you to tweak and send your questions in via twitter at -- to tweet and send your questions in via twitter at #womenpoli2013. also, silence your cell phones right now. everybody moving to silence the cell phones? good. and for those who could not attend tonight, the good news is that the event is being taped by the grimke event committee for anding via the website by c-span for viewing later on this fall. this event has come together
with massachusetts officials and mr. sullivan. we understand the humility. and i yield my time to the gentleman from virginia, mr. connolly. . . mr. connolly: i thank my colleague. i assure him it bonet be -- it won't be lengthy. when i first heard that barry sullivan was retiring, my reaction was, say it ain't so. i've been in this body for five years and one of the first people i met in orientation was barry sullivan. and as a son of boston, myself, as an irish catholic myself, as somebody whose family vacations where cod periodically, barry also vacations, i felt i was at home. i felt that there was a human face to this institution. who cared about it passionately, who had ties to tip o'neill and joe mogley, two great heros in my family's household in bostonment and i think barry has provided incredible service to the people's body, to this house, and has tried to ease stress, has tried to make our lives more comfortable. i cannot imagine what we're all going to do when our pager goes off and we don't hear that boston sta catow, you know, there will be four votes. this is the last series of the
1905.on v. massachusetts, there was a pastor in cambridge who refuse to get vaccinated for smallpox. said it was a religious objection. the supreme court said, too bad. tough luck. the bottom line is there is a point at which every person responsibility issue becomes a public health one. and the question is -- where is the line and what are the legal doctrines that govern the crossing over of that line? i would submit to you that we have surpassed that for this problem. yet we have not enacted any societal interventions that are meaningful to try to fix it. that is what needs to change. >> thank you, dr. lustig. i was wondering if you could speak little bit to other disease in addition to obesity, such as autoimmune disease. >> autoimmune disease is a grab bag. this is being televised, taped. and i am about the science. andscience on auto immune disease is very much an open question. to tella little loaathe you how all of this might tie into autoimmune disease, other than to say that people are working on it. i am very interested, but i am not willing to go public on it. not until
always assumed that, based on massachusetts' experience, the initial sign up will be very slow. and in fact, no payments have to be made until december 15 for coverage on january 1. so, while we don't like the problems we had in october and fixing it in november, we do not think it will impact the timeline because we have a six- month enrollment, so we still have four months left and individuals can apply up until march. >> thank you. thank you, mr. chairman. >> now to senator robert. -- senator roberts. senator robert? >> thank you, mr. chairman. 'm going to focus, if i can, on the concerns raised by senator isakson, alexander, and the chairman, on security and privacy. we have a law, the federal information security management .ct, his mother --fisma everything has to have an acronym. it requires each agency to a point a chief security officer to ensure americans private financial and identifying information is protected. and that is a big issue. secretary civilians revealed last week exchanges operating on temporary authority to operate. there is a 2012 12 memo from zyonts,
, the first woman senator from massachusetts in the u.s. senate. let's have a little applause right there. [applause] in addition, we have a number of other important female elected officials some of whom are with us tonight. we're honored to have present as well, steve grossman, treasurer of the commonwealth. and would other male elected officials stand who are here tonight in support of the cause of women in politics? [applause] tonight's event was sparked by a milestone in women's political activism 175 years ago right here in boston. angelina grimke, a white southerner from charleston, south carolina, became the first american woman to address the legislative body. tonight, we are honored to have her great-great-grandson with us. please give him applause. [applause] angelina grimke's purpose in addressing the legislative body was to present petitions bearing the signatures of 20,000 massachusetts women, black and white, to a joint committee of the general court. the petitioners sought to have congress end slavery in the district of columbia. before grimke spoke about the issue of slav
officers. and almost immediately the governor of massachusetts began recruiting free blacks. fly were distributed near and far from massachusetts to connecticut and pennsylvania, ohio, other northern states and even to canada. working to fill a first of 1,000 recruiters included prominent black frederick douglass and william henry johnson. the 45th massachusetts volunteer was the first northern black to be organized and among the recruit were two of frederick douglass' sons. the white officers were hand picked by the governor himself. subsequently, 23-year-old robert shaw became the chosen officer to lead the regular men had such great importance first because unlike the other black regularmen already organized in the south, it was composed of free black men. would rest on the conduct of the 45th massachusetts battle when the nay sayers were insisting blacks would not, could not fight. having no clue about the fire in their soul ready to ignite. frederick douglass. the 54th massachusetts four performed valiantly. they. they were honor recipient served. it was sergeant william consider
. it's got to be better. and it will be. take a look at that experience in massachusetts. the senator from california talked about that earlier. during the first month of enrollment in massachusetts, 123 people signed up. in the first 30 days. by the end of the year, though, 36,000 had signed up. the number of uninsured young people went from 25% to 10% within three years. massachusetts today, because of the leadership of governor mitt romney and the cooperation of the democratic legislature in that state, has nearly universal health insurance coverage. however the roll-out wasn't without some problems, just as ours s. thours is. the current governor said there were a series of web site problems. he also said the web site was a work in progress for the first few years. there were outages during peak times and problems searching for providers. i recently met with a doctor from boston. he's one of the best. he said, people in massachusetts can't remember what it was like before. they can't remember what it was like before people had health insurance. this doctor is an oncologist. he dea
is now back on the job serving and protecting the people of springfield, massachusetts. i'm also pleased to say nevada law also includes robust protections against this type of discrimination. officer carney testified before the house of representatives in 2007 and shared his story. mr. president, this is what he said: "i'm god cop. i've lost two and a half years of employment, fighting to get that job back because i'm gay. i never would have been able to do that had i not lived in massachusetts or in one of the handful of other states that protect employees from discrimination. sadly you mr. president, not everyone is able to fight back like officer carney. in 33 states, lesbian, gay yo cn be fired or harassed just for being who they are. sam hall was terrorized by his coworkers for seven years because he was gay. mr. hall just wanted to make a living. but supervisors told him he would have to endure the persecution if he wanted to keep his job. west virginia is one of 33 states with no protections against this type of discrimination. that's why, mr. president, i so admire joe manchin f
that because we know the product is good. senator boxer talked about the massachusetts experience in which during the first month of their enrollment for the massachusetts exchange, only .3 #% of the total signed up during that month. why? because people take time. this is not animal easy decision to sign up for health care. in connecticut where we have an exchang that's up and running, a wbsz thabs working, the first month, know our number? it was not.# # #%, but enrolled 10% of the expected total in the first 30 days, and here's what people say about their experience with connecticut's exchange. one said, this is a great resource for cops residents to apply for health coverage, thanks to the health care law. another said, i chose access health because i've been denied in the past by other carriers. before this law changed. another said, thank you so much for this health care law. i have not been insured in a decade. i am so, so, so thankful. another said, thank you for this program. i lost my job a year ago and couldn't find anything that i could afford in health coverage before this law
those created in massachusetts under then governor mitt romney. john kingsville who ran the program for massachusetts. vewashington journal" li every morning at 7:00 eastern. >> there are some serious dollars in women's studies. most departments include their ideological, academic courses. ideologically fervent to statistically challenged hard- liners set the tone. all that i have ever seen. a change of plans. conservative women's, moderate women, libertarian women, religious women left out. >> late century contentment is him -- feminism have led critics to label her as antifeminist. sunday, december first, your questions for the author. 54 three hours beginning at noon eastern. looking ahead to the new year, join mark levin january 5. in-depth, the first sunday of every month on c-span2. >> every weekend since 1998, book to be has brought you the -- non--fiction authors. > the fact that such women exist, it is not the way i would do it. i took 20 of maternity leave. i feel like that is the growing number -- that is the kind of woman that there can be space for. the fact that there
of banks for the commonwealth of massachusetts. it is my pleasure to testify before you today on be-half behalf of the conference of ou state supervisor.hold i thank you forin holding this n hearing today to address the risks and benefits of virtual currency. theri risks of virtual currency include consumer protection, payment systems, national ity, m security, money laundering, and other illicit activities. the potential benefits are also differ.fits are speed and efficiency, lower transaction costs, and providin an outlet for the unbanked and underbanked. with these evolving payment technologies states are exploring the connection between existing money transmitter regulation and virtual currencies. state regulators have long supervised money transmitters to protect consumers and preserve national security and lawnete enforcement interests. state regulators are talking with industry and other regulators about evolving methods of moving funds. this includes virtual currencies, prepaid cards, vir mobile services, andtu peer to pier transactions. state regulators believe that ae ope
.cotney mr. cotney is an active contributor to consumer protection efforts both in massachusetts and nationally. in 2013 he was elected as vice chairman of the board of directors of the conference of state bank supervisors whose behalf he testifies here today. mrs., mr. cotney. miss shasky-cavalry, if you could start. >> chairman warner and merkley, rafrking members kirk and heller and members of the subcommittee. i'm jennifer s hachlt sky calvery, the director of the financial crimes enforcement network. i'm pleased to be here to i'm he discuss the work we're doing at finsen to prevent illicit actors from exploiting the u.s. financial system as technological advances such as g virtual currency create new ways to move money. recognizing the potential for abuse of emerging new payment a methods anymd understanding tha anti-money laundering l protections must keep pace with these advancements, finsen begag working with our partners several years ago to study the issue. here's what we learned.le illicit actors might decide to use virtual currency for many of the same reasons as le
enrollment period. and just in terms of the massachusetts experience, young adults have waited somewhat longer but the uninsured rates among young adults is 21% in the year prior to the passage of the law in massachusetts. that rate dropped to 8% in the after. i think it does, the experience, the survey research that we've done, the experience in massachusetts does suggest young adults will come into the market places, the numbers will help do what we're hoping they would do not only helping them but also stabilizing the market. spent so, we used all sorts of information sources to, on a weekly basis, hit the restart button. i had a meeting with my senior folks every week, looking back at what we know about enrollment, what we know about folks who were on the ground. so if we know that holding an event in the evening results in five people showing up versus launch, you get 50 people to show up, that's where our resources go. so we look at everything that's happened to not only the data we're seeing but also what we're hearing from our sisters. orienteering from brokers in community grou
different ways from different parts of the british isles so you had puritan massachusetts, anglican virginia, maryland founded by catholic family, quaker pennsylvania, dutch reform new york. the framers of the constitution understood this when they decreed there would be no religious test for federal office and the authors of the bill of rights understood when they said congress shall make no law regarding an establishment of religion which meant there would be no national religion but it also meant among other things that states could maintain their established churches, the commonwealth of massachusetts maintained an established church until 1843. americans have learned from early times not only to polk but even prosper as a nation with cultural diversity but that diversity has also led to severe strains and in one case to a seemingly irrepressible conflict. the first was the mass movement of the scotch irish from northern ireland and lowland scotland in a dozen years before the american revolution. they started coming over in some numbers in 1713 but there was a real rush, a real surge af
speakers, and senators -- the gentlelady from massachusetts and washington state. i ask unanimous consent morning business be extended for these two for approximately ten minutes. the presiding officer: is there objection? seeing no objection, the request is granted. ms. mikulski: i now yield to the gentlelady from washington state and then massachusetts. the presiding officer: the gentlelady from washington. mrs. murray: first i want to thank the senator from maryland and the senator from maine for helping to bring so many of us to the floor today to talk about an issue that really cuts across bipartisan -- cuts across partisan lines and has plagued our nation's military and has gone unaddressed for far too long. military sexual assault is an epidemic, and it is right -- it has rightly been identified as such by the pentagon. it is absolutely unconscionable that a fellow service member, the person you rely on to have your back and to be there for you would commit such a terrible crime. it is simply appalling that they could commit such a personal violation of their brother or sister in u
president of jobs for the future in boston, massachusetts. kazis leaves the policy and advocacy efforts in jobs for the future -- an organization dedicated to improving education opportunities for low income americans. jfm has helped fostered better school to career transitions. his dedication to expanding a realnities is making difference for students in massachusetts and across the country. cases.elcome to mr. thank you for taking the time to share your expertise. much, senatorery warren. i now invite senator mikulski for an introduction. >> it is with leisure i kirwan.e dr. he has a distinguished career in higher education. he is a faculty member in the classroom trying to educate students. he was a faculty member for over 20 years. he served as the president of college park, the flagship at the university of maryland system. for the last 11 years, he has been chancellor of the university system. he is essentially -- don't tell governor o'malley this, he is the governor of the university system. during his time, he has faced big challenges that higher education faces. tuitions, the d
of this irresponsibility and the negligence of this company in massachusetts. a lawsuit was filed recently in nevada. two young boys were allegedly impacted significantly as a result of this medication that was really bad medication. unless the entire united states senate bends to that one senator's wish -- the one that voted "no" -- he will force this body to jump through hoops and work through the next several days wasting time to finish this crucial drug safety bill. but we're going to finish the bill. we're going to finish that bill. it's important for our country, and i can't let one senator dictate what goes on here in the senate. mr. president, following leader remarks, the senate will be in a period of morning business for two hours. republicans will control the first half, and the majority will control the final half. following that morning business, we will vote on the adoption of the motion to proceed to h.r. 3204, the pharmaceutical drug compounding bill. this is expected to -- i hope that in fact is the case. if thats case that is the case,e will said to what will happen subsequent to thasm
was based on what was done in massachusetts. and the experience of massachusetts was that in the first month 153 or 63 people signed up out of ultimate 36,000. it was less than 1% signed up in that first month. partly because buying insurance is a complicated process for a lot of people. when they have more choices, it means they're going to take more time. there's no doubt that we've lost some time but the website is getting better each week. by the end of this month it will be functioning for the majority of people who are using it. they will be able to shop, see what their choices are. the prices are good. the prices are not changing during the open enrollment period that goes until march. so i think that we'll have time to catch up. what's also been expressed as a concern is the mix of people that sign up. we might end up having millions of people sign up. they're happy with their new coverage, but we've got more people who are older, more likely to get sick than younger and healthier. we've got to monitor that carefully. we always anticipated though that younger folks would be the last
, and they will be lower because of the challenges on the website. with massachusetts, it is the president that makes sense -- precedent that makes sense to look at. you will see that the first month is going to be slow as people begin to familiarize themselves with options and then make choices they want to make when it comes to their health care. the othersident said day just a small fraction of americans would pay more. do you know what that fraction is? >> that is america question. i do not have that figure because here is the reality of what happens when you create a market that provides options to the american people. when you talk about it, and this is the focus we have discussed in the past, joe, on the portion of the percent -- 5% population that are insured in the individual insurance market, they often have one option, one carrier, one plan available, and every year that company can say your plan is canceled and here's your option, and it is usually a worse plan. what happens now to those individuals is they now have a variety of options. they have levels of coverage that begin with minimum leve
that the senator from the commonwealth of massachusetts is on the floor. i would inquire through the chair how long she is seeking to speak. we are about to proceed to the consideration of the amendment that has been filed by senator portman and cosponsored by senator ayotte, senator heller and senator mccain. and this is a rather complicated parliamentary situation. and then there's going to be a debate. if the senator from massachusetts is going to speak very briefly, i would withhold. if she's going to speak at length, then since we have members on their way, i would proceed. if we could inquire through the chair. mrs. warren: i would tell the senior senator from maine, my plan had been to speak for less than 10 minutes, but if that's not -- if that doesn't work, i certainly will yield to the senator from maine and do what she requests -- or whatever she needs here. ms. collins: madam president? the presiding officer: the senator from maine. ms. collins: i would ask unanimous consent that the senator from massachusetts be permitted to speak for no longer than 10 minutes, and if it were a little
about the open moment period look at massachusetts and mr. president, i am sure you are aware of this being in new jersey coast of massachusetts only 0.2% sign up for coverage and out of the 36,000 who ultimately signed up in the first year. so let's be clear that we wanted to see bigger numbers of informal care act is four times better than what massachusetts did in its first month if you talk to people in massachusetts, they love the her health care plan and this is place content based on a republican plant. and i'm going to go shopping and buy a new plan. i'm taking my time because i have time and want to discuss it with my husband. i'm going to sign up and i think it was the secretary that said that is not like buying a toaster. and you have to take your time. and so don't do that without having to put anything in place and focus on the problem that the president said he needs to fix. i want to play the great news about california. just in the first few weeks, enrollment has doubled. and our story is a really g
massachusetts. ms. warren: i ask that the quorum call be lifted. the presiding officer: without objection. ms. warren: and i ask for permission to speak as if in morning business. the presiding officer: without objection. ms. warren: thank you. madam president, it hasn't been even a month since the end of the government shutdown and they are already back trying to paralyze the government again. yesterday the kwepbz -- republicans blocked a up-or-down vote on the nomination of nina pilllard. this filibuster comes one week after the republicans filibustered the nomination of patricia millett to the d.c. circuit and less than a year after republicans filibustered caitlin halligan who eventually gave up and withdrew her nomination. republicans now hold the dubious distinction of having filibustered all three women that president obama nominated to the d.c. circuit. now, collectively these women have diverse experiences in private practice, in government and in public interest law. between them, they have argued an amazing 45 cases before the supreme court and have participated in many more. all t
, massachusetts. caller: good morning. i was born on march 21, 1960, so at the time i would have been a little over three and a half years old. i always remember, my first congress in memory that i ever had was being in the kitchen of our third-floor apartment and my mother crying. i remember asking her, you know, what was wrong, why was she crying, and she came out and said that it bad man or someone had shot the president. to this day i would give a million dollars to remember the questions i am sure i probably asked her as any three and a half-year-old would. she was a strong woman and really did not cry that often, but i remember to this day her crying and that really affected her like i guess they did the rest of the nation. every time i hear of the assassination, i always think that that was the first thing that i really remember happening in my life, my mother, how hard she took it that day. that is all i have to say. thank you. host: thank you for the call. i want to go back to one of the iconic photographs, november 22, the open air motorcade with the president and first lady. in fron
the gentleman from massachusetts. have other things you want to add? >> i think i got my last word in. >> earlier this morning, at the beginning of the hearing, chairman eyes asked about the anonymous shopper function. you said you had decided to direct cgi to disable because of defects. >> yes. >> with the gentleman yield question mark >> no. phrase, you were handed a document. it shows that there were no defects in the system. has blown up a box over the other statements made on the right-hand side of the box that 9:22.ays i have given you a sheet there that is clean from those boxes without the original blowups on their. do you have that? >> i think so. >> that is the original document. we refer me the last statement there starting with the defects identified? criticaltreated as target fixes for 9-12. >> that is what you testified for? you had found defects. yes. >> you decided to focus on compare. >> yes. the opportunity to choose the more critical function, plan compare is much more critical in the path of the consumer being able to enroll in health care as compared to the abilit
leader in the senate having lost his 60th vote in a special election in massachusetts that year, felt he could not pass anything. he could not achieve cloture with only 59 democrats to vote in favor of that motion for cloture. that's the reason why not one word was changed between christmas eve 2009 and the time this bill was actually passed. but if h.r. 3590, after it came back from the senate, came to the rules committee, did it come to the house under an open rule? no, it did no. it was a closed rule. we were kept out. process. it's hard to it -- kept house of the process. it's hard to -- the speaker pro tempore: the gentleman is recognized. mr. burgess: when a bill of this magnitude came with so little debate, so little input from the minority, yeah, we got a one-page bill before the house today. this was a 2,700-page bill that affected every man, woman, and child in this country, not just today, not just tomorrow, but for the next three decades they'll be living under this and it came under a closed rule. i reserve the balance of my time. the speaker pro tempore: the gentleman reser
of cultural and ethnic equality broad different parts of the british isles. so you have spirited massachusetts coming anglican and virginia virginia, maryland founded by a catholic family in quaker pa., a dutch reformed york. the framers of the constitution understood this when they decreed no test for federal office and the bill of rights understood when they said congress shall make no law to establish a religion that meant no national religion but it also meant thate states could maintain their established church as the commonwealth of massachusetts and as it remained until 18303. americans have learned toe not only toa cope but prosperulu as a nation of cultural diversity but that has led to severe strains ended one case the irrepressible conflict. the first is the mass movement of lee scott irish before the american revolution they started to come over and some members in 1730 but there is a real surge after the seven years' war from the war of 1763 like earlier colonial settlers they did not come because of a mixture of religious or political reasons and so were coercion like white inden
body and at massachusetts. -- in massachusetts. [applause] today only 25% of our legislature is women and in the senate the number has only grown to 13%. this is not just a problem in massachusetts. 18% of the seats in congress are women. there is not enough progress and we need to do everything we can to encourage and support women wet dreams of running for office. those of us who are female legislatures -- we need to do everything we can to encourage and support women who have dreams of running for office. those of us who are female legislatures we need to do everything we can to encourage and support women who have dreams of running for office. don't close the door behind you. keep it open. [applause] in to be to many women feel they don't have enough credentials to run and resign themselves to be content in the background, often behind man. several woman web achieved a level of public office have begun their careers later in life. takemore women will not the initiative to run unless they are directly asked too many times. consider this -- my official request to you is to
small business, another small business wants a $20 co-pay. so we know that from the massachusetts connector experience in small group market and we know that based on the commercial side of the market. and i have a private board that made many of these decisions with a lot of input from policy stakeholder workgroups. so we decided early on that we wanted, that we didn't want to limit products. we wanted carriers to be as innovative as they wanted to be. the one early decision that we made, which was unanimously recommended by all stakeholders including consumer groups, providers and carriers was that we would not allow benefits substitutions to the central health benefits package. and so that products could have additional benefits like acupuncture as an example, if not one of the core benefits. so the variation in product is really additional benefits on top of the essential health benefits benchmarked and the variation in your out of pocket liability. so the co-pay, coinsurance, et cetera. >> thank you. spent thank you. i also work in coalition with many asian-american organizat
. johnson becomes john mccormick of massachusetts who is the speaker of the house. he is next in line. we were told a few minutes ago that the air force had jet planes on the ramp by nearby andrews air force base ready to take off. texas and maybe they have by this point. they will bring mr. johnson and other members of the parties back here and or to take some of the kennedy family to texas. i assume mr. johnson will return to washington immediately and will take over the late president kennedy's duties. that is about all of the detail we have at the moment. the president's brother was presiding over the senate in lyndon johnson's absence. when the vice president leaves his job in the senate he can turn his gavel over to anyone. senator edward kennedy was presiding when the word came of the shooting. it was not known whether the president was dead or alive at the time. a reporter in the press gallery gave the word to a senate page went down and told senators on the floor. the senate was adjourned immediately and was called back into session for a prayer. in the meantime, the members left
economic growth. the state of massachusetts has generally been very well on this and basically massachusetts has imported high skilled, high education people. it's exported metal skill that is a relatively small state. you have got, what, six-point something million people in a little less than arizona. california has 38 million in texas has 25 million. so massachusetts is almost like a single nice metro area that's worked out pretty well. but you still have pretty high levels of any quality as well. so, you know, call on the people that say they want more inequality -- more income equality how come the places that you run have the highest income inequality. and they think the answer is you tax the middle income people out, you have high housing costs by environmental regulations and other things like california, for example but also, metro new york. no population increase in the last 40 years. it's the same. immigrants in and americans out. that's been the pattern. if you want to raise a family and you are not high income, phd educated, you have a decent job, what does the hou
people and sickened 751 in 20 states. this issue hits home for me because it started in massachusetts. at the center of this tragedy was the new england compounding center, also known as necc, and it was located in framingham, massachusetts. i met some of these victims of this terrible outbreak and heard about their struggles, like jerry cohen, a resident of pik pikesville, maryland, who went to the doctor for routine steroid injections to treat recurring back pain and received two doses that came from the contaminated lots. jerry suffered a stroke and had to adjust to a new life, dealing with dizziness, nausea, weakness and exhaustion. or melanie, whose mother went into a tennessee hospital to treat an acute back injury she suffered while mowing the lawn. instead of walking out of the hospital, marjorie instead became severely sick, spent months in the hospital and a nursing home and now has permanent -- permanent nerve damage and medical bills that are close to putting her into bankruptcy. for the last decade, complaints aboutsteabout sterility have bed benz necc yet the company was
from -- timeframe. we know from last week when the president visited massachusetts, the closest existing program like this, a very similar program launched in massachusetts, you have a dynamic where enrollment was very slow initially. only 123 people in the first month in massachusetts. and then built up steadily over the course of time. 0.3%123 represented .20 -- of what would be the overall enrollment at the end of the day. >> what has called you to challenge that? >> the president has called on the house to take up the legislation and pass it. we are not laying down a challenge. we are obviously disappointed when any lawmaker announces that he or she does not support extraordinarily fair basic americans,for lgbt protection that other americans enjoy, and that they should enjoy. we will work with congress. we look forward to passage in the senate. we are heartened by the developments in the senate that brought us this far. believe the momentum behind equal rights is such that we will prevail as a country on this issue. >> very quickly, the book that -- oming out, double down p
-- butrollment period what we've learned in massachusetts is when it comes to enrolling in health care, any of us wait until the end to get it done. what didator tavenner, the administration anticipates would be the pattern, of enrollment, prior, what were you thinking prior to the launch of, and do you the early problems you had are moing to affect the long-ter pattern in enrollment? >> we assumed we would be able to enroll folks throughout the six months, but that that greatest surge would come in december, because we got there were people who wanted coverage on january 1 and the second search would come late february, early march, by the individuals who were not as motivated to get insurance. figures, butment they were lower for october him and i think they will be low, and it follows the massachusetts experience, and that was part of the reason for such a long and rome at period -- such a long enrollment period in the first year. >> and you have time to get these problems fixed? >> i think we have time. >> we agreed that the problems of the website are unacceptable, but our expe
is that the governor of massachusetts estimated that only 123 consumers signed up in the first month but eventually tens of thousands did and now today the state has nearly universal coverage. they went from one in four people having insurance to uninsured being one in four to 2340u being one in ten. we know the results so to me it's a reminder of what our goal was which is to address double digit increases in insurance rates were preventing people from getting insurance coverage. so to me the issues of the website and software since it's part of a background i've had before, to me it's about writing code and getting things tested and it's very frustrating for andnd struggling for months months and months to get a scientific way to clean up that resource. that case it's about just getting the code right and making it work and making it function. in that case, governor romney for and got a three month did he clay. i'm not asking you to comment on that. i know the chairman asked to you comment on that. but i think there is no shame in pushing out a date based on technology. that's my opinion. and i w
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